| Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Bumps and Babies

Parenting styles uncovered

Time Out Kids pitches your biggest parental worries to three very different family experts

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Before the kids are born, we think we have it all figured out. Deciding what sort of delivery we want, how we’ll feed them and encouraging healthy routines covers much of parenting, right? But how many of us discuss what we’ll do when we encounter the first public tantrum? The refusal to eat five meals in a row or share toys at nursery? A preschooler who still wakes up four times a night or a six-year-old who doesn’t like school?

Most of us probably just wing it, hoping we’re vaguely on the same page and muddling our way through each challenge as it hits us. Approaches such as time-outs, time-ins, reward charts, hugging it out and using logical consequences are thrown around social media and talked about by friends as we search for answers to a seemingly never-ending list of parenting questions.

However, just as no two children are the same, neither are us parents. There isn’t a one-size-fits-all approach to this raising children lark and so we’ve asked the local experts to reveal different ways we can all deal with some of the most common concerns...

The year of no sleep Newborn to 12 months

Everybody tells me I need to get my one-month-old into a routine of eat, sleep and play, but she doesn’t want to settle unless she is in my arms...

Joanne Jewell, Mindful Parenting
“The most important thing for a young baby is to feel loved and cared for. At this age their needs are entirely met by you and these needs include being held and comforted. Baby-wearing can be really beneficial for you and your baby, as you can carry them both at home and while out so they feel close to you, but you are still able to use your hands to carry out tasks at home or look after other children, if you have them. Your husband can also carry the baby and allow you some time to look after yourself, as self-care is vital when you are giving so much of yourself to your new baby.”

Super Granny
“Up to six to eight weeks a baby needs to demand feed. However, this fussing quickly changes to wanting to sleep and not really wanting to eat. It’s easy for mothers to confuse this cry and feed every two hours instead of putting a pacifier in their mouths, aiding the need to suck and letting them sleep. Habits are easily created from ten weeks old, so do not start a habit that you cannot continue. Settle her by using a pacifier and giving them a gentle pat on the bum when you see the tired signals such as yawning, hiccups, blowing bubbles with saliva and darting eyes. Don’t wait until they are over-tired.”

Amy Vogelaar, Love Parenting UAE
“Sit back and relax – this is normal newborn behaviour! Your baby has never known anything but your womb for nine months and during the first three to four months of life on the outside she really is still a lot like a foetus. You can even consider it the fourth trimester of pregnancy. The fact is that the natural habitat of a newborn is her mother’s body. This means that when in skin-to-skin contact, or even just on Mother’s chest, a young baby will be most physiologically stable. Oxygen levels, blood sugar levels, heart rate, respiration rate, blood pressure, body temperature, feeding instincts and growth rate are all exactly as they are supposed to be. So, trust your baby and hold and cuddle your little one now while she is small.”

My baby of seven months is still waking throughout the night to feed. I’ve tried to “dream feed” (gently rousing my baby to feed at night), but he still wakes an average of three times after this. How can I get him to sleep longer?

Joanne Jewell, Mindful Parenting
“All babies are different, so the important thing is not to compare your son to other babies who may have different sleeping patterns. There are many studies which tell us that a child’s sleep is mainly dependent on their genetics rather than anything you are doing or not doing and evidence shows that at six months only 16 percent of babies reliably sleep through the night, with 13 percent still waking at least three times per night. It’s not possible to provide a one-size-fits-all solution here. However, it would be worthwhile to look at your son’s sleeping environment, his bedtime, time spent napping during the day and whether he is experiencing any separation anxiety from you. It’s always harder to comfort our children when we are tired ourselves, so if you can share the night-time waking with your husband then that would help your self-care, which in turn would help you to care for your son during this time.”

Super Granny
“This can be happening because of a habit that has been created. If you keep feeding through the night, they will keep waking through the night. They do not need feeds at this age – their digestive system needs to rest. You can start by shrinking the feeds − do less and less every night. Remember also that the way you put your baby to sleep (preferably in an awake state) is the way they put themselves to sleep in the middle of the night. So, if they constantly fall asleep while drinking, they will look for this in the middle of the night. They need to self-soothe and I prefer using a pacifier for this.”

Amy Vogelaar, Love Parenting UAE
“Some parents find that trying to give a dream feed actually increases night waking as it disturbs a baby’s natural sleep pattern. Try going without it for a couple of nights and see what happens. Babies at this age still require lots of night-time parenting. You can try feeding more often in the day, especially if you have been replacing milk with solid food too rapidly and perhaps try nursing in dark, quiet places so that he gets more calories during the day. This is no guarantee, however, because not all night waking is about hunger. Keep in mind that this high-needs stage doesn’t last forever. All babies grow up and sleep through the night on their own, they just do it at their own pace. All your hard work and devotion now will pay off later in a happy, secure child who feels loved and has positive associations with sleep.”

Is it okay to share a bed with my baby? He only settles when he is beside me and I am tired of sleeping on the floor beside his crib.

Joanne Jewell, Mindful Parenting
“There are mixed views about the safety of bed-sharing and co-sleeping and the American Academy of Pediatrics currently recommends that parents don’t co-sleep with babies under four months old. I think that there can be lots of benefits with co-sleeping with children – both for them and us – so if you are thinking of doing this then I suggest you read the guidelines so you are happy with doing it in the way that is safest for both of you.”

Super Granny
“Sharing a bed with a baby is your choice. However, it is not a case of if you are going to stop that, it is a case of when. The earlier they learn to sleep in their own beds, the easier it is to train and that is really what it is – training and habit. Babies need to learn to self-soothe. They are not born with the ability and I believe your bed is to be shared with your husband.”

Amy Vogelaar, Love Parenting UAE
“Bed sharing is controversial, as many paediatric experts will tell you that it’s unsafe and can lead to suffocation. But most babies in the world do sleep beside their mothers, and if a mother is breastfeeding and follows certain safety guidelines it can be a very safe and natural way to parent your little one at night, and has been proven to lead to more sleep for everyone. Many studies and well-respected experts have found bed-sharing to be safe if the mother did not smoke during pregnancy and if she is breastfeeding. All infants, regardless of whether they are in their own bed, should always sleep on their backs, on firm surfaces, on clean surfaces, in the absence of second-hand smoke, under light and comfortable blanketing. And their heads should never be covered. The baby’s head should be well away from pillows and stuffed toys and there should be no gaps or crevices that the baby could fall or slip into.”

The years of independence

Ages one to three
When we go to the supermarket my two-year-old always tries to run away from me. I don’t want to use baby reins and she won’t stay in the trolley. What can I do to keep her safe while still enjoying our time?

Joanne Jewell, Mindful Parenting
“Children this age are learning through experience and it is part of their ‘job description’ to test, experiment and push boundaries. So she is doing exactly this. Our job is to teach them the skills they need to know in a respectful and age-appropriate way, understanding that some of the skills will take a long time to learn and we will need to repeat them on a regular basis. Speak to her before you get to the supermarket, empathise that you know she finds it hard to sit in the trolley and that you are going to play a game with her to make it easier. Pull funny faces, talk about the items you are purchasing, engage her in counting and putting things in bags, and also understand that her attention span is going to be very short at this age. Save the larger shops for when you can go without her.”

Super Granny
“If a child does not listen to you at home, she will not listen at the shops. First, teach her to listen when you call her to come at home. Hold her hand and teach her using a little game, for instance ‘Red light, Green light’ or ‘Run and Stop’. This way, she knows what you mean when you say ‘Stop’ or ‘Red light’. When you are at the shops, you can use the trolley as a ‘time out’, so when she doesn’t respond to ‘Run, run, run, and stop!’ you say, ‘You didn’t listen – time out’. Then you place her in the trolley for one minute before you take her out and, in a fun way, try again. You can also attach a ribbon to the trolley or pushchair or pram for her to hold onto and walk alongside.”

Amy Vogelaar, Love Parenting UAE
“Grocery shopping is boring, even for big kids (and many adults)! If you put yourself in the shoes of a two-year-old, you can understand how tedious and frustrating it must be for them. One way of coping is to limit the times you have to bring your toddler to the shop. Can you order in instead? Or, perhaps, do it when another adult is available to care for her? If you have to bring a toddler to the store, choose your timing wisely – don’t go when she (or you) are tired, hungry or frustrated. Then you need to find a way to keep it interesting and engaging for her.”

My two-year-old won’t share and has become a bit of a bully at playgroup. Help!?

Joanne Jewell, Mindful Parenting
“A two-year-old will find it hard to share as this isn’t a skill they have naturally developed yet. You can role-model and teach sharing at home – playing a game and sharing a drink or some food. He will benefit from you talking calmly at home, before going to playgroup, about what is going to happen there. Empathise with him about how it can be hard to share and then give him a coping strategy for when he finds it difficult. This will usually be asking you or another adult for help. As mentioned, children this age really benefit from consistent boundaries that are set with respect, empathy and are regularly talked about when they are calm and connected to you.”

Super Granny
“Two year olds do not have a concept of time, so sharing is not a natural behaviour − it’s a learned behaviour. They also only ‘parallel play’ until they are three years old, then they play with others. However, that does not mean you don’t model it, teach it and repeat it. So, playing games at home with Mummy and Daddy, using sharing, is very effective. Take a toy, play and say: ‘Now its Mummy’s turn – good waiting! Now it’s your turn’. Modelling and repetition is how they learn. If he is displaying aggressive behaviour I would look at his diet, especially the hidden sugars like flavoured yoghurts, too much cows’ milk, cereals, breads and pastas. These can have the same effect as eating spoonfuls of sugar.”

Amy Vogelaar, Love Parenting UAE
“Toddlers are not yet able to understand the need for sharing, let alone have the skills to do it most of the time. For many kids, being in a large group of children who are likely to grab your toys off you is a very stressful activity. If your child is having a hard time then consider finding smaller groups for play sessions, or find a friend for one-on-one play and make sure there are enough toys to go around. When your child grabs the toy from another child, especially if he hits or bites (which is normal toddler behaviour), then you will need to make it clear that it is not okay to hurt other people. But don’t force him apologise, as it means nothing to him at this age. Rather, you can model apologising and make the other parent feel better by saying: ‘We are sorry, sharing is hard and we are still learning that hitting or biting is not okay.’ Give the injured child love and attention, but don’t punish your child.”

My little girl won’t let anyone else pour her juice, hold her hand, give her a bath – she always says “Mummy do” and Mummy is pregnant and very tired. How can we help her see that Daddy can do it just as well?

Joanne Jewell, Mindful Parenting
“Children often use us ‘helping’ them as a way to connect with us and make time to get our attention. This is a normal part of their development and their need to have regular opportunities to connect, particularly with their primary attachment figure – you! I know this can feel exhausting when you are pregnant and this could be one of the reasons she is seeking more ‘connection’, as she knows things are going to change soon. Try and find times when you can ‘connect’ with her one-on-one by doing activities such as reading, playing a game or just cuddling so that she feels she is getting enough from you and is happier to let Daddy help.”

Super Granny
“This is generally not because of a preference for Mum, but more a form of wanting to have control and be in charge. Children often have a flavour-of-the-month parent and this need not be tolerated for several reasons. One is that it breaks the bond between the other parent and child because it pushes that parent out and bonding happens through spending time together. Another reason is that giving control and authority to someone who has no wisdom will not end well. Give a child options only when it is an option. Having only Mummy bath her is not an option, it’s an instruction. She knows Daddy can do it and she knows she will enjoy it, too. She is just trying to be in charge. When a parent loses or hands over their position of authority, someone else has to fill their shoes – a child cannot do this effectively!”

Amy Vogelaar, Love Parenting UAE
“It’s very normal toddler behavior, especially when Mummy is pregnant and probably not acting like herself. It’s important that you spend plenty of good quality time with her when you are feeling rested and well enough to give her lots of love and attention, as she will need extra reassurance that you are still there for her. But Daddy also needs to spend some quality time alone with her. Get out of the house one evening a week so they can find a bedtime routine together that is separate from you. Dads do things differently from mums, but different doesn’t mean it’s wrong and you need to believe that as much as your daughter does!”

The years of pushing boundaries

Ages four to seven
My four-year-old cries every day at school drop-off and we end up having a battle at the classroom door because he doesn’t want to go in. The teacher says he settles fine once I am gone, but it’s very hard on us both. Any advice?

Joanne Jewell, Mindful Parenting
“This can be an age when separation anxiety is more prevalent, especially around times when your child feels they are going to disconnect from you. If you can find time to give him extra connection before and after school – an extra hug or a few minutes chatting quietly – this will help. Keep the routine at home as calm as possible. Talk to him about how he is feeling, empathise that it can feel hard to say goodbye in the morning and you understand he feels a bit sad. When he’s calm, talk to him about strategies he can use when he feels worried – taking a big breath or telling an adult, and see if the teacher can have something interesting ready for him to do and look forward to when he gets to school. One of my children’s teachers used to have an activity table for them to use when they arrived if they found it difficult to say goodbye and this really helped.”

Super Granny
“Four year olds understand working towards a goal. This is a good time to use an incentive chart to motivate him towards changing his behaviour. Explain what will happen when he moves up his chart. The reward should be building memories with Mum or Dad – not toys or sweets! After every fifth successful drop-off at school, he can claim his reward. And remember to DROP and GO and not to linger. Make sure there is the same routine every morning and try to be there early and avoid entering a noisy, overwhelming classroom.”

Amy Vogelaar, Love Parenting UAE
This is really normal behaviour for such a young child, and they do grow out of it, but it is stressful for everyone. You can make sure you are giving him extra-special together time and some age-appropriate opportunities to be in control when he is not in school. ToddlerCalm recommends engaging in daily child-led play, which means spending ten minutes a day (per child, per parent) playing together and doing exactly what he wants to do. Follow his instructions, or just observe and take an interest in what you see him doing. When he is feeling anxious or sad about saying goodbye to you at school, you can remind him that he has this special time to look forward to and start to plan for once you are reunited.”

We have a five-year-old and a two-year-old who both insist on sleeping with Mum and Dad and nobody is getting a decent night’s sleep. What can we do?

Joanne Jewell, Mindful Parenting
“Sleep and bedtime can feel like a big disconnection for children, so it can be hard for them to let go of you. Depending on how you feel about co-sleeping, you have a few options – you can get a bigger bed so there is room for all of you to sleep; you can start with putting their mattresses on your bedroom floor and letting them sleep there, so they are in the room with you but not in bed; or you can also try sleeping in their room and working on getting them used to staying there for longer. I’m not sure if they go to bed in their own rooms then come to you later or start off in your bed – either way, they are both still at an age when lots of children need the physical comfort of Mum and Dad, so being respectful and gentle in any method you use is going to be important to help them transition.”

Super Granny
“Again, I have to ask – who’s the boss? You have what you have allowed! Every time you don’t take them back to their beds, it reinforces that they are allowed to try it again. However, I’ve found if children aren’t listening in the day to instructions such as ‘go bath’ or ‘pick up your toys’, why would they listen to ‘stay in your bed’ at night time? So, first sort out obedience in the day time, then you can expect them to stay in their beds at night.”

Amy Vogelaar, Love Parenting UAE
“My feeling about co-sleeping is that if it is working for you, keep doing it; if it stops working for you, find another solution. ToddlerCalm suggests some sensory cues that you can use to encourage more independent sleep habits over time. Making the child’s bed and bedroom pleasant and cosy, playing relaxing sleep music every night, using some relaxing scents like lavender or chamomile, can all create an environment that, when used consistently, become associated with sleep. A final trick that has worked for children for many generations is a comfort object or transitional object. Children use these objects to be reminded of you and the comfort you provide even when you are not there.”

Our seven-year-old is constantly fighting with his little sister and says we favour her on everything. It ends up with row after row. How can we manage this sibling rivalry?

Joanne Jewell, Mindful Parenting
“Sibling rivalry is like the slow burning embers at the end of a fire and we as parents need to ensure we aren’t fuelling this fire with our behaviours. The main concept to understand is that all children benefit most from being treated uniquely and a really practical way of doing this is when one child comes to us with a complaint about another child, avoid being drawn into a conversation about the other child and instead keep your focus and attention on the child who is talking to you. We do this by listening, empathising with how they feel and not judging the feeling – remember, jealousy is a feeling and it needs to be heard and accepted in order for it to dissipate. I’m sure you make every effort to treat your children equally, but your son needs you to understand his feeling rather than being given reasons about why it isn’t true.”

Super Granny
“When you have two children, one is usually more introverted and sensitive and the other more verbal and boisterous. Generally, the more sensitive one will feel the other is preferred. However, parents try to equalise everything to ‘be fair’ instead of giving privileges to the older child as well as more responsibilities. This often causes sibling rivalry. I suggest parents use the ‘leader of the week’ principle. This is when the older one gets six days to be leader and the younger one gets to be leader one day a week (on a day that the older one gets to pick). Then they get to make all the decisions and choices for their day as they are a leader, but if they have attitude or don’t consider others (being a good leader) then they lose their privilege and defer to the sibling. This teaches them to be awesome leaders.”

Amy Vogelaar, Love Parenting UAE
“I would refer any issues with over seven-year-olds to Joanne Jewell from Mindful Parenting UAE, as she works with parents of older kids and teaches a sibling class specifically.”

We have the pickiest eater in the entire world and every day brings new eating challenges. I worry she is not getting enough nutritious food and meal times are a battle. How can we change this?

Joanne Jewell, Mindful Parenting
“Meal times can be stressful when you have a child who doesn’t want to eat or is very choosy about what they like. It’s important to understand that, while it’s one of our jobs to give our children a healthy, balanced meal, we can’t force them to eat it and the more anxious we become, and use strategies such as reward or punishment, the more anxious the child will become. Always put at least one thing on her plate that you know she likes – even if it’s the same thing at every mealtime – and then add other things for her to try. One strategy I used with my son was to create a mini-buffet at meal times, so food was put in small bowls in the middle of the table and he and his brothers could get to choose what they wanted to try. I found this significantly reduced the worry for me and him and, after a few weeks, he was open to trying new things.”

Super Granny
“You are correct – she needs nutritious food. And who else is going to teach her this, if her parents don’t? Picky eaters can learn to acquire a taste for things through regular exposure. We practise ‘worst-ees first-ees’, which means to eat one bite of your worst one first, then a bite of your favourite food on the plate. If they don’t want to, that’s fine, then they sit at the table and wait until the meal is over. They do not have to eat, they can skip a meal, but this is all that is offered. Remember, no child has ever died of hunger if they have been offered food. An appetite can only improve and they will be extra hungry for the next ‘worst-ees first-ees’.”

Amy Vogelaar, Love Parenting UAE
“Your child needs to eat multiple times a day for the rest of her life, so the lessons you teach her now will affect her forever. One of the main recommendations I give is to stop fighting the mealtime battle all together. Instead, follow the ‘Division of Responsibility’ approach to feeding your children, which was identified by Ellen Sattyr and is advocated by most child psychologists and nutritionists today. You’re responsible for providing nutritious foods at regular, predictable intervals, deciding what foods you will and won’t make available, and modelling eating it yourself. You’re also responsible for keeping mealtimes pleasant and free from pressure and stress. The rest is the responsibility of the child – what to eat, how much to eat, whether to eat. If they don’t like what you’ve offered, all you need to say is: ‘you don’t have to eat it’.”

The tweenage drama years

Ages eight to eleven
My ten-year-old daughter doesn’t have a best friend and says she has no-one to play with at school. Her teacher has tried to make sure she’s included and I’ve organised playdates, but she seems so lonely. How can I help her build the friendship she craves?

Joanne Jewell, Mindful Parenting
“Girls of this age do crave friendships and it can be hard if they don’t have friends that they’ve grown up with, either because they have moved school or friends have left. The best way to help her build friendships is to help her develop the skills she needs to start and maintain these relationships. These include listening, co-operating, kindness, empathy, self-awareness and the ability to manage our emotions. If you reflected on the skills she has, and maybe spoke to her teacher, I wonder if there are any friendship skills that she hasn’t yet developed and you could help her with. Having worked with children of this age group over many years I’ve found that helping them in this way has the best long-term success rate and, once they felt more confident in the skills, helping them to engage in activities they enjoy really helps, as they’re more likely to find friends.”

Super Granny
“Arranging one-on-one playdates is a valuable tool. This way they bond out of school and connect at school. Role-play with your child, helping her with open-ended questions to ask such as ‘what’s your favourite colour?’ or ‘do you have a pet at home?’ or ‘what sport do you like to play?’ Some adults don’t even know how to initiate a conversation, much less a ten-year-old. Help her to find out something interesting about another child and then to remember to bring it up a few days later. People don’t care how much you know; they care about how much you care.”

I find myself constantly repeating the most basic instructions to my nine-year-old – he doesn’t ever seem to listen to anything I say unless I’ve said it ten times! It’s like we have regressed to toddler years. Please help.

Joanne Jewell, Mindful Parenting
“The brain of a nine-year-old is developing and listening isn’t always one of the skills they focus on building. However, it’s a really important one in building friendships as we mentioned above. When you need him to listen, ensure he is connected to you – make eye contact, touch his hand or arm gently to check he’s listening before you start speaking. Doing this before you give any instruction will make it easier for you both. In addition, speaking to him calmly about your concerns when he is in a calm, logical state of mind and asking how you can help him – to listen in this case – is always a good way to approach problems that are an ongoing issue.”

Super Granny
“You have what you have allowed. If you speak ten times, he will wait ten times. If you have trained him to know that after you have said “no” six times it then turns into a “yes”, he will persevere. We teach others how to treat us. Psychologists Cloud and Townsend said: ‘We change our behaviour when the pain of staying the same is more than the pain of changing’. Make sure that whatever you do not allow has a significant consequence to help them remember.”

Privacy has become a big thing in our house with our eight-year-old who won’t have anyone else in the room while she gets changed, but she insists on locking the bathroom door which worries me. How do I get the balance between giving her privacy and being safe?

Joanne Jewell, Mindful Parenting
“It sounds like she is worried that if the door isn’t locked then someone will enter when she is changing. Could you set a boundary that people will knock on the door and ask to enter before they come in? If this was talked about and agreed, then role modelled and used by everyone, I believe this would be sufficient for her. Empathise with her need for privacy first and explain that you understand this and want to help her, and that you also need to ensure her safety and this is one way you can do it.”

Super Granny
“Privacy is earned – it’s not a right. If your house rule is not to lock doors, then the rule is not to lock doors! She doesn’t get to change the rule because she has a preference. She does not see the bigger picture like you do. Insist that the door stays unlocked and that anyone will have to knock before entering, thereby ensuring her privacy.”

My ten-year-old has turned into a hormonal pre-teen and my husband is struggling to deal with this change from a relatively placid, easy-going child to a weeping, angry pre-teenager. Any advice as to how I can help him deal with her moods and understand her a little more?

Joanne Jewell, Mindful Parenting
“Connecting with a ten-year-old can feel difficult at times and it sounds like your husband would benefit from finding some strategies to re-build this connection as she is getting older. Are there any activities they can do together that would strengthen their relationship and make it easier for him to empathise and understand that she is struggling with the hormone and brain changes that are occurring at this time? It sounds like you are finding it easier to empathise with her, so helping him relate to what it feels like as a girl of this age would be really helpful for them both.”

Super Granny
“Evening primrose oil is a great addition to the breakfast table to help with those mood swings, as well as a healthy diet. Remember also that your parenting style needs to change with pre-teenagers. It is by no means the same as with under sixes, who need a firm, assertive approach. For example, ‘I said it, you do it!’ This firmness lays the foundation for respect and obedience and allows them to earn and appreciate the freedom they so crave as they grow.

“The assertive parent has tight boundaries, isn’t scared to say “no” and gives consequences, consistently. This makes a child feel safe. However, you can’t stay there. You have to move onto the next style, which is the teacher/trainer style. This is relevant when a child is six to 12 years of age, or if he or she has reached a level of maturity where they are displaying respect and obedience. Then they earn the right to negotiate. Soon, it moves onto the coaching parent, a parenting style which is suitable for teenagers and pre-teens. Here, you would parent using a more questioning approach, wider boundaries and less rules, allowing children to contribute suggestions for consequences of behaviour. However, parents need to not save or protect them from suffering the consequences of their choices.”

Meet the experts

Joanne Jewell, Mindful Parenting UAE

Joanne Jewell’s Mindful Parenting courses are based on forming strong connections between parents and children and utilising that connection to enable us to teach our children the skills they need to grow into balanced, well-adjusted and successful adults. She has been working to help families create and maintain warm, natural and open connections for the past 15 years both in the UK and the UAE.
www.mindfulparentinguae.com (050 950 6526).

Andalene Salvesen, Super Granny

Andalene Salvesen is a mother of four and grandmother of nine and is also known as Super Granny. She founded the successful Munchkins organisation, running workshops, one-on-one home sessions, blogs and online advice for parents. Andalene combines her practical knowledge and experience of being a stay-at-home mum, and then running a nursery for eight years, to coach and help families find solutions to a range of issues.
www.munchkins.me.

Amy Vogelaar, love parenting UAE

Amy Vogelaar is a licensed midwife in Washington State in the USA, an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, an IAIM Certified Infant Massage instructor, and a licensed BabyCalm and ToddlerCalm teacher and consultant. Along with her colleague Jasmine Collin, she is co-founder of Love Parenting UAE and teaches positive, gentle, evidence-based classes and workshops for parents from pregnancy through to the infant and toddler stages.
ww.loveparentinguae.com.

By Carolyne Allmark and Emer O’Doherty
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