Best coffee in Dubai

Wake up and smell the best coffee in Dubai Comments

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What’s different about Arabic coffee?

Meeting for a coffee is something that the Bedouins have been doing for centuries – the drink would be the first thing they’d offer to their guests. Unlike the coffee commonly drunk in the West, however, traditional Arabic coffee is not filtered. Instead, the coffee grounds are boiled in a kezveh (copper pan) and served from an elaborate teapot known as a dallah into a cup or a glass. The coffee isn’t filtered, so it can only be drunk and enjoyed once the grounds have fallen to the bottom. Arabic coffee is about as strong as an espresso. The taste, however, is completely different, thanks to the use of spices such as cardamine.

Readers’ choice

Time Out asked the good people of Dubai to vote for their favourite mainstream coffee house.

• 23% Starbucks
• 22% Caribou Coffee
• 22% Costa Coffee
• 12% Caffè Nero
• 10% Other
• 5% Gloria Jeans
• 5% Second Cup
• 2% Dunkin’ Donuts

Coffee: good or evil?

It’s difficult to know what to think about coffee. One minute we’re told that it’s bad for us, the next we’re being told to drink more. So is coffee our friend or foe? Time Out corners local nutrition expert Belinda Rennie and demands answers.

‘Coffee contains antioxidants and can be considered a healthy drink [if limited] to one or two cups a day,’ says Belinda. ‘It stimulates the cortex of the brain, improves attention, concentration and coordination as well as dilating blood vessels and helping muscles to contract – the reason why most people like to drink it first thing in the morning.’

While this is all well and good, Belinda says the benefits of coffee decrease the more you drink. ‘Coffee has caffeine in it, which is an addictive stimulant, and this is where the problem lies. If you’re using coffee as
a substitute for food and a wake-up call, it may mean you aren’t getting sustained energy from eating a balanced diet and getting enough rest. Add the diuretic factor [coffee dehydrates you] and you could be losing more water from your body than you take in from a cup of coffee.’

Belinda says this is when coffee drinkers begin to feel jittery and irritable, though these effects vary from person to person depending on how quickly the liver can break down and metabolise the chemical components of coffee. ‘If you get a headache and feel lousy after just two to three days without caffeine (the classic weekend headache), then maybe you’re ready for a gentle liver detox.’
Belinda Rennie is a nutritionist working from Cooper Health Clinic. Contact her at belinda@lifestyle-suae.com (04 348 6344).

By Oliver Robinson
Time Out Dubai,

User reviews:

Posted by: Ash Dubai on 13 Feb ' 13 at 11:15

I can't believe that Coffee Planet was missed off of this list. You see their Coffee all over Dubai and it is some of the best there is. http://www.mycoffeeplanet.com

Posted by: JamesElbert on 08 Oct ' 11 at 23:44

You d better create a small area of interest merchandise or merchandise may also be found in the market.

Posted by: Mario Hardy on 17 Dec ' 10 at 03:34

I agree with Dave that the figures published seem far fetch. For more accurate and reliable statistics you may review information from the International Coffee Organization http://www.ico.org/ .

In terms of the reviews; these are some of the good places in Dubai and I agree that coffee is much more appreciated if the environment is also pleasing. To discover the best coffee places in Dubai and also around the world; visit www.map2cafe.com which is an online community for coffee lovers listing the best 150+ coffee shops from around the globe.

Posted by: Dr m kutiya nawala on 14 Dec ' 10 at 08:09

Nice review. For coffee enthusiasts- for excellent coffee e at home one of the newer machine prepares coffee from whole beans to professional/cafe standards. These machines though expensive(£600-1000) are a useful addition in yr home if u enjoy coffee.

Posted by: Dave Edwards on 13 Dec ' 10 at 07:39

None of the figures in the opening paragraph make the slightest bit of sense. Even allowing for the obvious miscalculation, the idea that the coffee market has gown six-fold in two years is ludicrous. As is the idea that the UAE coffee market will almost double in the next four years (typical half-witted Euromonitor tosh). You should be ashamed to publish such garbage.

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