See National Geographic documentary Jane at Dubai’s Warehouse Four

Go for a free dose of culture (and a gripping tale)

See National Geographic documentary Jane at Dubai’s Warehouse Four
Credit the Jane Goodall Institute
See National Geographic documentary Jane at Dubai’s Warehouse Four Image #2
National Geographic Creative
See National Geographic documentary Jane at Dubai’s Warehouse Four Image #3
See National Geographic documentary Jane at Dubai’s Warehouse Four Image #4
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In 1960, a 26-year-old English woman travelled to Tanzania to study chimpanzees. At that time it was mandated by the British government that she have a travel partner as it was deemed inappropriate that she travel alone.

Undeterred, the woman set off with her mother, unaware that the groundbreaking research that she would undertake would make headlines around the globe and change the perception of the species forever.

Jane tells the story of Jane Goodall, an animal-obsessed conservationist whose chimpanzee research challenged the male-dominated scientific consensus of her time and revolutionised our understanding of the natural world.

The National Geographic documentary draws from 100 hours of never-seen-before footage shot in Tanzania’s Gombe National Park in the 1960s, from award-winning director Brett Morgen (Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck and The Kid Stays in the Picture).

Now the BAFTA-nominated film, which has been named best documentary of 2017 by the prestigious Producers Guild of America, American Cinema Editors and Broadcast Film Critics Association among others, is being shown during a one-off (free) screening at Warehouse Four on Tuesday April 30.

The film opens in 1960 in Gombe, as Goodall embarks on her first research expedition to study chimpanzees.

Patiently gaining the animals’ trust, she soon makes headlines with the discovery that chimps are highly intelligent and social creatures that use tools to gather food.

And what’s a documentary without a love interest? When dashing Dutch filmmaker Hugo van Lawick is sent by National Geographic to document Jane’s work in 1964, the pair fall in love in during a blissful jungle romance.

But the course of true love never runs smooth, with professional commitments, polio outbreaks and violence among the chimps threatening the couple’s idyllic existence.

Van Lawick’s footage was rediscovered in National Geographic’s archives — and while pristine, it was not without its challenges.

Reel upon reel of 16mm film was out of order and without notes or audio, leaving Morgen and his team the tasks of organising the vast archive, identifying 160 chimpanzees and re-creating the sounds of Gombe’s forest.

The result is an editing feat that brings the forgotten footage back to life, offering an unprecedented portrait of the trailblazer who defied the odds to become one of the world’s most admired conservationists.

This is one that we really can’t wait to see.
Free. Tue Apr 30, 7pm. Warehouse Four, Al Quoz (04 221 2160).

WHAT IS IT...
An award-winning documentary at Warehouse Four

WHY GO...
For a free dose of culture (and a gripping tale)

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