Mini breaks on the moon beetle burgers – the travel industry in 2119

Is Hilton’s future hotel 100 years from now too far-fetched?

Mini breaks on the moon beetle burgers – the travel industry in 2119
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Mini breaks on the moon, 3D printed room service and holographic animal guests represent the hotel history 100 years from now.

According, at least, to Hilton it does.

The global group is celebrating its centenary year in 2019 and it has published an out-of-this-world blueprint of where the travel industry will be in 2119.

The Future of Hospitality report, backed by expert voices from across the humanitarian, technology, food and beverage and hospital industries, claims we’ll arrive at our destination in flying autonomous pods, walk into the lobby that changes to our demands right there and then, be it bar or spa, before having our every desire brought to reality through technological advances.

It also predicts that advances in space travel will see tourists sign up to moon-walking tours, mountaintop resorts clear of coastline dangers and faraway desert spaces with extreme temperatures.

While a more plant-based diet for all means we’ll be chowing down on insects, seaweed and even plankton for food while 3D tech will literally print food for room service.

However, there are questionable assumptions the group has jumped too – including guests using microchips under their skin to control the surrounding environment and hotels becoming the “Town Hall” of communities by “managing local resources and contributing to the areas they serve with community-tended insect farms and vertical hydroponic crop gardens”.

While we’re not entirely convinced that local bin collection meetings will be taking place in a virtual reality infinity pool resort, images of an artist’s interpretation certainly capture the imagination.

One shows a pyramid hotel made from plastics dredged out of the seas perched next to a waterfall as the aforementioned pods whizz around.

Others show meals of the future providing full and clear nutritional data for each guest as robots will use biometric data to automatically create dishes based on preferences and health needs.

Fitness fans can expect to compete against a virtual sea turtle in the pool or challenge yourself to climb the digital face of the world’s tallest summit Mount Everest.

Hilton says the state-of-the-art changes will increase as technology improves – citing its very own introduction of air-conditioning and in-room televisions as proof of the game-changing advances.

Simon Vincent, EVP & president, EMEA Hilton, added: “Last year, Hilton also became the first hospitality company to set science-based targets to reduce its environmental impact.

“We enter our second century with the same commitment to innovation, harnessing the power of our people and technology to respond to guest demands.

“Our research paints an exciting future for the hospitality industry, highlighting the growing importance of human interaction in an increasingly tech-centric world.”

Despite all this technology, Hilton also claims digital detoxes and “tech-free time” will be increasingly sought out.

Whatever happens, the future sure looks alien.

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